Baby Corner
Member Login









Month by Month Baby Calendar
Learn what to expect during your baby's first years with our month by month baby calendar. Choose your baby's age below to see how your baby is developing.

1 Week
2 Weeks
3 Weeks
4 Weeks
2 Months
3 Months
4 Months
5 Months
6 Months
7 Months
8 Months
9 Months
10 Months
11 Months
12 Months
13 Months
14 Months
15 Months
16 Months
17 Months
18 Months
19 Months
20 Months
21 Months
22 Months
23 Months
24 Months

Baby Photo Contest
Enter your baby into Baby Corner's free baby photo contest for a chance to win Fisher-Price Laugh & Learn Learning Puppy!!

Baby Photo Contest Home
Upload & Manage Your Photos
See Past Winners!


New Today at Baby Corner

Follow Us!
You are here: Home > Baby > Parenting

Driving in the Burbs

by Ann E. Butenas |
0 Comments

I now have three little boys.

One would think that would be reason enough to invest in a vehicle fully-equipped to accommodate a growing family and their equally growing needs. Instead, my husband and I opt to hang on to our three trusty cars. He has a pick-up truck and a sports car, and I drive a practical sedan.

After our first son was born, we had all of the luxury of a full back seat. The only thing between his car seat and the back of my head was ample leg room. When our second son was born, we simply placed one car seat on either side of the back seat, keeping them far enough apart so one would not be able to touch the other. By this point, our first son's legs had gotten considerably longer, and he was now able to throw temper tantrums on the back of my head while I was driving by kicking his feet as hard as he could while the infant began to scream. Keeping focused on the road became difficult. I was sure my auto insurance rates would increase, as driving with two little ones in the back seat is comparable to driving with your eyes closed. I used to quickly turn around and try to soften the situation back there. I considered placing a pair of sunglasses on the back of my head so they would think Mommy was actually keeping an eye on them.

As they grew and both were facing the front, as opposed to the rear-facing infant seats they started out in, they began to laugh and entertain each other while I drove. Sometimes they would hold hands, stretching their arms out across the seat to one another. Other times, they would throw cookies across the back seat at each other and then expect me to crawl back there, while I was driving, of course, and retrieve the edibles. There is this notion in toddlers that while a person is driving a car, he or she is equally capable of retrieving a pacifier or tying a shoe or even cooking a full-course meal. I have often had to turn a deaf ear to their screams...as I was practically deaf by this time, anyway...and continue to drive. I was almost certain that while I was waiting at stoplights, drivers in adjacent vehicles could hear the boys screaming and wonder what was going on. If there was a minivan next to me, I reassured myself that this was another mom in an equally nerve-wrecking situation, so I would discreetly turn my head to see how she was handling it, and I would find a young mother, smiling and nodding her head, as if listening to music, and three young children would be calmly sitting in the back. "An outrage!" I thought. "Those are not her kids! She has hired actors!" As the light turned green, I would attempt to barrel out of there, leaving dust in the other mother's face, but unfortunately, my oldest son has thrown his shoe up front, displacing the rear-view mirror and landing on the floorboard opposite me. The minivan scoots happily ahead. I reach down to grab the shoe, and as I get up, I glance at the minivan and happen to notice a bumper sticker emblazoned on the rear of it: "Motherhood...A Proud Profession."

Can I put this on a resume?

More from Ann...
Toddlers and Shopping
Mealtime
Parking Lots

Ann E Butenas is a stay-at-home mom of three preschool-age boys. She has an undergraduate degree in Communications, a post-bachelor paralegal certificate, and a Master's in Business Management. She earned the latter during her first two pregnancies while running an at-home business at the same time. She has been professionally published as a writer since the age of 12.

Ann currently owns and operates ANZ Publications, a publications business specializing in family-riented projects. Her most recent project includes a very unique medical and dental records binder.a great way to keep track of a child's complete medical history from birth through adolescence. Visit the site at http://www.anzpublications.com. ANZ is an acronym, by the way, for her son's Alec, Noah, and Zach. It is pronounced as "Ann's," for her first name, but spelled as such to include the boys!

Her website showcases her new book.

Be the first to add your comment, or ask a question.

Add Comment

You are commenting as Guest.
Please register or login if you would like to be notified by email of replies to your comment.

Type your comment in the box below.