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You are here: Home > Baby > Breastfeeding

Breast Milk LeakageNow There's a Real Solution

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Many expectant mothers are aware of the wonderful opportunity they have to enhance the physical and emotional bond with their babies by breastfeeding as soon as possible after childbirth. It is also recommended that a baby be breastfed for the first year of life. Despite these advantages to nursing, a return to the workplace or an otherwise busy life may bring about challenges that make it difficult to continue breastfeeding. Those mothers who cannot or choose not to nurse may also experience these challenges soon after childbirth.

Breast Milk Leakage (BML) is a challenge that most new mothers encounter, resulting in inconvenience, embarrassment and discomfort. Whether or not a new mother initiates breastfeeding, her body will begin producing breast milk soon after her baby is born. BML is the uncontrollable release of breast milk from the nipple in response to a reflex in lactating women known as "letdown", or Milk Ejection Reflex (MER). Healthcare providers often tell breastfeeding mothers to expect BML for 2-3 weeks postpartum. To the contrary, studies indicate that over 90% struggle with BML at 2 months postpartum, and 66% of nursing women continue to experience BML at 6 months postpartum.

Breastfeeding mothers often use nursing pads to absorb leakage. Without frequent changes, these pads can leak through resulting in wet clothing, discomfort and a higher susceptibility to sore nipples and breast infections. Other solutions that are recommended to temporarily control BML include the use of patterned clothing to hide leakage and breast shells to collect milk. More often that not, these methods are ineffective in controlling BML and can even contribute to further complications. Unfortunately, the lack of a safe and effective solution to BML has caused many new mothers to wean prematurely.

Non-breastfeeding and weaning mothers also experience BML. In the past these mothers were given lactation suppressing medications that are no longer available. Binding with elastic bandages is the method often used in absence of these medications, to assist in the process of "drying up". However, most women consider it extremely uncomfortable, inconvenient, and often harmful.

As a result, new mothers are now turning to a recently introduced breakthrough product called blis (the Breast Leakage Inhibitor System). blis, a patented, FDA certified product is a soft, flexible disc that safely and effectively controls BML by using the natural method of gentle, even pressure on the nipple which stops leakage and prevents wetness on the skin and clothing. blis is also a safe and effective alternative to binding, and can be worn day and night to control BML and provide comfort during periods of engorgement, while a mother's milk supply decreases naturally.

New motherhood and the pressures of modern life bring about many concerns for today's women. Fortunately, blis provides a proactive solution to one of these concerns by safely and effectively controlling BML and eliminating leakage worries, allowing new mothers the confidence to pursue an active postpartum lifestyle. To find out more about BML call 888-410-2547 or visit www.blis.com

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Sore Nipples by Jack Newman, M.D.

Editor's note: The information above was contributed by Erika Davis, ProLac Inc.

Showing 1 - 3 out of 3 Comments
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Judith Gabrile Nov 21, 2010 05:00:11 AM ET

I am a young lady i have not given birth but i have the problem of bml is realy affecting me, how do i get the blis and how is it use?

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Isis Oct 22, 2009 01:50:08 PM ET

Lovely article.i really waned to know about this stuff.thanks for sharing. :)

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Gauraw Oct 16, 2009 03:55:08 PM ET

Thanks for the information & for sharing the link.

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