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You are here: Home - Pregnancy - Celebrity Pregnancy

Kate and the Next Royal Baby Update

by Katlyn Joy | October 17, 2014 12:00 AM
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Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, is still suffering from acute hyperemesis gravidarum, or severe morning sickness. This was more obvious, since she missed a key event in her new charity outreach position.

Kate has been named the new royal patron of the 1851 Trust, a charity which combines helping needy kids and teens through the sport of sailing, a favorite interest of hers.

Kate is still recovering at her parents' home, with no official word on when Kate will resume her schedule. Reportedly, her bout with severe morning sickness is even worse in her second pregnancy.

Instead, she released this statement regarding her absence from the charity's event on Monday, "I feel very fortunate to have enjoyed sailing from a young age. And I know it is a great way of providing young people with the opportunity to develop skills and confidence."

The 1851 Trust was launched in Portsmouth, England on Monday and is supported by Sir Ben Ainslie, Gold medalist Olympian. The aim of the group is to bring back the America's Cup to Britain, where it has been gone since 1851, hence the name.

"It is a hugely exciting time of sailing. ... I am looking forward to being a part of this journey and I hope that through the 1851 Trust we can engage and inspire a new generation into sailing along the way," commented Kate.

This is hardly the Duchess' sole charitable function. She also, according to the palace, serves as Royal Patron of the Art Room; Patron of the National Portrait Gallery, London; Royal Patron of East Anglia's Children's Hospices; Patron of Action on Addiction; Occasional Volunteer in the Scout Association; Patron of SportsAid; Patron of Place2Be; and Patron of the National History Museum.

The next big event looming on the horizon for Kate in royal duties is late this month, on Friday, October 24, when she is scheduled to appear in a meet and greet with the President of Singapore. Already, the word from palace is less than optimistic to members of the press, that while Kate "very much hopes to be able to undertake this engagement," it is still quite up in the air.

"As with all recent engagements her attendance will be reviewed closer to the time, depending on her health," is the official line.

Hyperemesis gravidarum can require hospitalization, and all precautions are being taken. She is being seen by Dr. Alan Farthing, the Royal obstetrician at her parents' home. Also, the local hospital in the town of Reading is on alert of any possible emergency situation with the Duchess and unborn child.

While most cases of morning sickness subside at the end of the first trimester, HG can impact some unlucky sufferers throughout the entire pregnancy. It causes severe nausea and vomiting, to the point where mothers can become dehydrated, requiring intravenous drips. Women may have trouble gaining sufficient weight when dealing with this complication that affects approximately 2 percent of pregnancies.

Reportedly, Kate only suffered for a few horrible weeks in her first pregnancy, while she is currently on week 4 in this pregnancy of being ill with HG.

Having HG in a first pregnancy raises the risks for having the condition in subsequent pregnancies. Other factors that mean a higher risk of hyperemesis gravidarum include carrying multiples, being overweight, and the presence of trophoblastic disease where there is an abnormal growth of cells in the uterus.

Treatments include using methods such as are used with motion-sickness, such as wrist bands, ginger and such, taking in small but frequent meals, and if that proves impossible or unsuccessful hospitalization may be required. In the hospital, IVs are likely to be used, and possibly all nutrition will be delivered via IV, not just for hydration. Some anti-nausea medications are also delivered through IVs or suppositories, if oral medication cannot be used.


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